life's greatest enigma

helloknightmares:

He can either terrify you or—- 

melina-dolls:

As soft as silk by *Mrs Mawi* on Flickr.

i was tagged! by catnipforkhoshekh

Book meme rules:

“10+ books that have stayed with you in some way. Don’t take but a few minutes, and don’t think too hard—they don’t have to be the “right” or “great” works, just the ones that have touched you”

  1. harry potter series
  2. to kill a mocking bird
  3. maniac magee
  4. tell me your dreams
  5. stinky cheese man and other fairly stupid tales
  6. the magicians
  7. catcher in the rye
  8. kite runner
  9. speak
  10. hardy boys series

i shall tag:

calanthes moderatelyvivid pretty-pretty-boys violetpoof puffsan

helloknightmares:

Its not much but this is what we call home.

birdsout:

IMG_8475 on Flickr.

face-up for Spuldoll Kanguk
it was not as easy as it looks like, because the head has extremely poor symmetry >.<

helloknightmares:

A single pair of eyelashes are enough for these two. :v 
Victoria even has two layers.

menimienaimori:

Red Demon by Dar-k-ling
karla-chans-bjds:

semiotickitten:

thebjdhotel:

thefrozenrose:

aspergersissues:

ultrafacts:

Source For more facts follow Ultrafacts

This is sickening.

I went to a school like this when I was in grade six. My inhalers were locked up in the office, and I was having an attack. My memories are a bit foggy (I couldn’t breathe after all) but I recall my twin sister and somebody else wheeling me all the way to the office in a computer chair. Thankfully I was lucky and got my meds in time; I ended up off school for a week and a half recovering.
This shit is scary. Rescue inhalers should be on the person of the child who NEEDS them, and if they are too young then they should be with the caregiver. There is absolutely no excuse to keep RESCUE MEDICATIONS locked up away from the people who need them FAST.

Wow, what kind of school does this? I think it was only really when we were very young (4-8) that our school had a policy of giving the teacher the medication who would then prompt the child to take it when needed. After that we could carry around our own things including inhalers, pills, painkillers etc. 

My little sister’s school tried to do this, had my mom put her inhaler in a plastic bag with her name and leave it in the nurse’s office. School nurses are already such jokes, I’ve never met one that seemed more qualified than, “you have a fever, let’s call you mom” or when I would have one of my notoriously crippling migraines, all she would do was tell me to lay down in a dark side room on a really uncomfortable bed for an hour - then go back to class. I was not offered anything like ibuprofen or even aspirin, and I wasn’t even allowed to bring my own to school. (Even though I did, because fuck you.)
My mom was livid. She demanded to speak to the principal and immediately through a huge ugly stink about how absolutely dangerous it was to have a rescue inhaler all the way practically on the other side of the school, locked in an office with someone hardly equipped for headaches and vomit. They tried to tell her about how my sister would show it to everyone and how she would use it all the time and basically all this total BS - putting all the blame on the children.
… I think it is safe to say that my mom raised all the circles of hell and fiery logic rained down on this stupid motherfucker. They instead made a “deal” and started allowing children to leave their inhalers in the teacher’s desk. Which, while better, is still completely ridiculous. Kids who need rescue inhalers or epi-pens are taught how lifesaving and necessary they are and why they need them. They don’t wave them around and nuisance other kids, I mean seriously.
This happened probably seven or eight years ago but I am still pissed.

I fully agree with you, I mean this is very dangerous and the welfare of the child should be most important. Things like epi-pens it is probably a good idea for both the teacher and the child to have one, because some people only have minutes before they could die depending on the severity of the allergies. 
The only reason I think I child should not have these is if they have other needs, which means they would not be capable of being able to sort themselves out and would need a career. However most children should be allowed to have these things on them. Especially if it could potentially mean a loss of life. 

i had a similar experience when i was in elementary school. in second grade, the first year i started at this school, my mom had to fight in order for me to keep my inhaler. lucky she was able to talk to the vice principal, who was an asthmatic himself, and he told me teacher that i must keep it on me at all times. still was a hassle though and it still got to the point where i had to lie about having asthma to keep my inhaler on me. if i had an asthma attack, i would that ask to the go to the bathroom. in 5th grade though, i had i pretty bad asthma attack. the teacher didn&#8217;t know and tried to drag me downstairs to the clinic (which was super far from the classroom). lucky for me, the vice principal was around and spotted me and my teacher and stopped her and instructed her not to move me and called the ambulance.
and to be honest, even as an adult, asthma is not taken seriously. where i live i still can not get the help i need to keep it under control.. fucking sucks&#8230;.

karla-chans-bjds:

semiotickitten:

thebjdhotel:

thefrozenrose:

aspergersissues:

ultrafacts:

Source For more facts follow Ultrafacts

This is sickening.

I went to a school like this when I was in grade six. My inhalers were locked up in the office, and I was having an attack. My memories are a bit foggy (I couldn’t breathe after all) but I recall my twin sister and somebody else wheeling me all the way to the office in a computer chair. Thankfully I was lucky and got my meds in time; I ended up off school for a week and a half recovering.

This shit is scary. Rescue inhalers should be on the person of the child who NEEDS them, and if they are too young then they should be with the caregiver. There is absolutely no excuse to keep RESCUE MEDICATIONS locked up away from the people who need them FAST.

Wow, what kind of school does this? I think it was only really when we were very young (4-8) that our school had a policy of giving the teacher the medication who would then prompt the child to take it when needed. After that we could carry around our own things including inhalers, pills, painkillers etc. 

My little sister’s school tried to do this, had my mom put her inhaler in a plastic bag with her name and leave it in the nurse’s office. School nurses are already such jokes, I’ve never met one that seemed more qualified than, “you have a fever, let’s call you mom” or when I would have one of my notoriously crippling migraines, all she would do was tell me to lay down in a dark side room on a really uncomfortable bed for an hour - then go back to class. I was not offered anything like ibuprofen or even aspirin, and I wasn’t even allowed to bring my own to school. (Even though I did, because fuck you.)

My mom was livid. She demanded to speak to the principal and immediately through a huge ugly stink about how absolutely dangerous it was to have a rescue inhaler all the way practically on the other side of the school, locked in an office with someone hardly equipped for headaches and vomit. They tried to tell her about how my sister would show it to everyone and how she would use it all the time and basically all this total BS - putting all the blame on the children.

… I think it is safe to say that my mom raised all the circles of hell and fiery logic rained down on this stupid motherfucker. They instead made a “deal” and started allowing children to leave their inhalers in the teacher’s desk. Which, while better, is still completely ridiculous. Kids who need rescue inhalers or epi-pens are taught how lifesaving and necessary they are and why they need them. They don’t wave them around and nuisance other kids, I mean seriously.

This happened probably seven or eight years ago but I am still pissed.

I fully agree with you, I mean this is very dangerous and the welfare of the child should be most important. Things like epi-pens it is probably a good idea for both the teacher and the child to have one, because some people only have minutes before they could die depending on the severity of the allergies. 

The only reason I think I child should not have these is if they have other needs, which means they would not be capable of being able to sort themselves out and would need a career. However most children should be allowed to have these things on them. Especially if it could potentially mean a loss of life. 

i had a similar experience when i was in elementary school. in second grade, the first year i started at this school, my mom had to fight in order for me to keep my inhaler. lucky she was able to talk to the vice principal, who was an asthmatic himself, and he told me teacher that i must keep it on me at all times. still was a hassle though and it still got to the point where i had to lie about having asthma to keep my inhaler on me. if i had an asthma attack, i would that ask to the go to the bathroom. in 5th grade though, i had i pretty bad asthma attack. the teacher didn’t know and tried to drag me downstairs to the clinic (which was super far from the classroom). lucky for me, the vice principal was around and spotted me and my teacher and stopped her and instructed her not to move me and called the ambulance.

and to be honest, even as an adult, asthma is not taken seriously. where i live i still can not get the help i need to keep it under control.. fucking sucks….

bjd-resinrome:

FW 1st Update (Homme Suits, Accessories) by Freedom Teller on Flickr.